• Books,  Weekly Wraps

    W.W.W. Wednesdays: April 30, 2014

    It’s the last day of April!! Can you believe it? I cannot. At least the weather here in the Midwest has begun to cooperate. Outside looks and feels like Spring rather than Winter. I also cannot believe it’s going to be May, because that means I have five weeks left in the school year. I have five weeks to write 3 papers and these are not tiny, friendly essays. Breathe, as I used to say to my friends working the 2008 Presidential campaign. Just breathe. On that note, let’s get to this weeks W.W.W. Wednesday!

  • Books,  Fiction,  Reviews

    From the Desert To the Improbable: The Tenth Saint and An Archeological Adventure

      The arid, unforgiving desert of Ethiopia plays host to the majority of D.J Niko’s thrilling novel. The Tenth Saint follows the work of Sarah Weston, an Oxford trained archeologist too independent for her own good. While on a dig, Sarah uncovers a tomb filled with perplexing finds. A tall, white man with good and advanced dentistry dating to the 4th century? An obscure dialect carved into the walls? Sarah, driven by a wish to learn and share the past, dives into an archeological mystery that will threaten her life,  her career, and question the impossible.

  • Life & Reflections,  Musings,  Religion

    “To Be or Not To Be”: My Take On the Choice to Be “Spiritual, but not Religious”

    For weeks now, I have been composing a post in response to an article written about the “spiritual, but not religious.” Yet, my multiple starts did not have an ending or it read as a ramble about my beliefs. The article that caused me such writing strife, “My Take: ‘I’m spiritual, but not religious’ is a cop-out,” is by Alan Miller and is posted in the CNN Belief Blog.

  • Poetry

    Self-Loathing

    * This poem comes with a disclaimer. It was written years ago when I was very angry at organized religion. imprinted by creeds of omniscient oracles knees and palms are pierced by gravel we beg for our penance

  • Books,  Non-Fiction,  Reviews

    Exterminating Literacy Would Turn the World into Goddess Worshipping, Earth Loving Hippies – Doesn’t sound too bad

      “The Alphabet Versus The Goddess” constantly reminded me of a book idea a girl in my senior year AP Euro class recommended, history from the perspective of taxation.  However, instead of taxation, Leonard Shlain examines history from the view of literacy and its effect on the feminine.  He claims that “writing fosters a patriarchal outlook” dissolving the role of the goddess and effectively the rights of women.